Flowers of the Bladderworts

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Bladderworts, these strange carnivorous plants produce beautiful little flowers and sprout out stem-like stolons with numerous tiny vacuum traps under water, or underground, to capture and consume their minute prey. Often their flowers are the best way to identify these curious plants, and there are 12 species that are found on Long Island. Of those 12 species, 10 have yellow flowers, and 2 have purple flowers.

The first photograph, is of the purple flowers of the Eastern Purple Bladderwort, Utricularia purpurea. This aquatic plant is found freely floating in the water of a number of ponds in the pine barrens of Long Island, with their masses of traps arranged as branching whorls along their long stolons. In the second and third photographs, we see the flower of the Lavender Bladderwort, Utricularia resupinata, and the fourth photo shows its ripening fruit. This plant grows affixed to the soil and sends its traps underground, with only its flower visible to the world above. Mostly growing in sandy or somewhat mucky substrates, it sometimes goes for long periods of time without flowering. On Long Island, the plant is only known from two coastal plains ponds, and it seems to flower most when the water levels become low, in shallow water or very wet soil. Though the flowers may be very small, they are magnificent in their delicate beauty.

For the fifth photograph, we have the yellow flowers of the Horned Bladderwort, Utricularia cornuta. Most of the locations where this plant grows on Long Island, tends to be ponds that are isolated and go through periods of drying out, or brimming full with rain water, depending on the year. Some years will find a pond dried of its surface water, but where the soil still remains saturated. When this occurs, the pond basin completely fills with an explosion of growth of Utricularia cornuta. Appearing as a pleasant summer meadow bathed in the sunlight, a low field of little yellow flowers, that gently trembles with the wind of a passing breeze.

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