Flowers from the Bogs

01-9718wms05-7684wms07-4684wms6505wms8114wms

Where the carnivorous plants grow, there are many other denizens of the bogs, ponds and wetlands. Some of these other denizens produce beautiful flowers, and they often do so around the time when the carnivorous plants are at the peak of their growing season. When exploring the habitats for carnivorous plants, one will invariably encounter the intricate and colorful flowers that are neighbors to the carnivores which are the focus of this project. In the first photograph, there is Rose Coreopsis, Coreopsis rosea, with a tiny crab spider concealed and laying in wait for a potential meal. The plant is usually found along the coastal plains pond shores where many carnivorous plants grow as well. The second photograph is of the Meadow Beauty, Rhexia viginica, also found along coastal plains pond shores and frequently accompanying carnivorous plants in wet, sandy habitats. The third photograph is of the Bog White Violet, Viola lanceolata. Quite commonly seen, it is pictured at the edge of another coastal plains pond. The fourth photograph shows the bog-orchid Rose Pogonia, Pogonia ophioglossoides. This image was taken at a Sphagnum bog where Atantic White Cedar and the pitcher plant, Sarracenia purpurea grow, along with many other species of carnivorous plants. The fifth, and final photograph, is of the Grass Pink bog-orchid, Calopogon tuberosus. This location is in a sand dune swale that dips to the ground water, keeping the sandy soil consistently wet with fresh water. The sunny meadow habitat is protected by stunted pine trees, and is accompanied by a fantastic population of the threadleaf sundew, Drosera filiformis. These are but a few of the many interesting and beautiful flowers that are seen in the habitats of carnivorous plants. They add delightful additions to the natural history wonders encountered when exploring these wetlands, and create a charming balance to the seemingly sinister nature of the carnivorous plants.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s